On Friday, November 18, I had the privilege of participating on a panel at the 2016 Bay Area Battery Summit: Energy Storage at Inflection Point. The one-day summit, organized by CalCharge and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, addressed fundamental questions about energy storage Research, Development, Demonstration and Deployment (RDD&D). I was a member of the “Innovation in Energy Storage Panel,” moderated by Brian J. Bartholomeusz, Executive Director Innovation Transfer at Stanford

I’ve written several posts over the past two months about the Galaxy Note 7 battery fires that led Samsung to remove it from the market. In my prior post, I reported, from a Wall Street Journal article, that “investors have shaved off roughly $20 billion in Samsung’s market value. The company has said the recall would cost it $5 billion or more, including lost sales.” The big question now is

It’s been a rough month for Li-ion smartphone batteries. I’ve chronicled the unfortunate events Samsung has experienced with its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone in prior posts: Samsung is Just the Latest and The Cost of Battery Failure. The October 24 issue of The Wall Street Journal provides the latest update in its article, “The Fatal Mistake That Doomed Samsung’s Galaxy Note.” Fear: Samsung Incident Triggers a Wide-Ranging Inquiry into Li-ion

Last week 4,000 research scientists and engineers, including many specializing in battery technology, convened for PRiME 2016 at the Hawaii Convention Center in Honolulu. This year’s conference marked the 25th anniversary of the lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery’s commercialization in 1991. Pioneering scientists who helped transform Li-ion technology into the engine that powers today’s mobile devices delivered several symposia presentations. John Goodenough, whose discovery of the lithium cobalt oxide cathode paved the

In June, I posted a series of three perspectives on the future of the smartwatch. While each has a slightly different viewpoint, they all agree that the smartwatch has to untether from the smartphone to fully realize its potential and accelerate market adoption. The second post in the series, A GREAT LEAP FORWARD: Don’t Leave Home Without It, focused on the future of the Apple Watch. It noted that the

Frost & Sullivan is a global research and consulting organization that focuses on identifying “The Next Big Things” in the industries it covers by understanding the interplay between industry convergence, mega trends, technologies and market trends. According to a Frost & Sullivan report, Implications of Mega Trends on Batteries, “Rapid advances in wearable devices and the Internet of Things (IoT) are being mirrored by breakthrough innovations in battery technologies.” The

Rob Price’s March 14, 2016 Business Insider article, “Google’s smartwatch king has a 50-year vision for the future of Android Wear,” is crafted from his interview with David Singleton, Google’s director of Android Wear. Singleton’s ambitious vision is that, “”The smartwatch will feed you information before you ask for it, act as your ‘agent’ in the internet-connected world around you, and keep you healthy-even talking to your doctor before you

Mark Sullivan’s March 10, 2016 Fast Company article, “Apple Watch 2: How the World’s Best Smartwatch Might Makes Its Great Leap Forward,” takes a stab at answering two questions: How will the Apple Watch 2 be better than the first Watch? What will Apple add to the device to make it more useful and necessary to more people? First, Apple is expected to address shortcomings of its initial smartwatch, which

I recently attended a Gartner webinar and read articles in Business Insider and Fast Company that contemplate the future of the smartwatch. While each presents a slightly different perspective, they all agree that the smartwatch has to untether from the smartphone to fully realize its potential and accelerate market adoption. The Gartner webinar, presented on March 15, 2016, is titled “Wearables at the Peak of Inflated Expectations: Myths and Realities.”