The last few months of 2016, I wrote several posts about lithium-ion safety issues. This included reporting on the cost of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 failure, and that it was just the latest in a series of high-profile lithium-ion battery mishaps. Previously, I had written about how Li-ion battery safety problems were the legacy of Sony’s decision to repurpose audio cassette magnetic recording tape equipment for battery production in



On Friday, November 18, I had the privilege of participating on a panel at the 2016 Bay Area Battery Summit: Energy Storage at Inflection Point. The one-day summit, organized by CalCharge and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, addressed fundamental questions about energy storage Research, Development, Demonstration and Deployment (RDD&D). I was a member of the “Innovation in Energy Storage Panel,” moderated by Brian J. Bartholomeusz, Executive Director Innovation Transfer at Stanford



If this is the first post you’ve read in this series, BUILDING A BETTER BATTERY, you may want to take a look at Parts One, Two, Three, and Four for complete context. A Better Business Model Enovix was conceived with a conviction that building a better battery involves more than just technology; it requires a new business model with ownership of intellectual property (IP) and direct production control. Since 2012,



If this is the first post you’ve read in this series, BUILDING A BETTER BATTERY, you may want to take a look at Parts One, Two and Three for complete context. In the prior post, I outlined the Enovix co-founders’ vision for building a better battery. It’s differs from that of many other battery startups in several aspects. First, rather than pursue a novel chemistry, Enovix sought to unlock the



BUILDING A BETTER BATTERY is a series that started in response to a reader’s comment about the length of time it’s taking to commercialize our 3D Silicon™ Lithium-ion Rechargeable Battery. Part One benchmarked the most recent battery breakthrough, and presented an explanation as to why there has been no significant advancement in battery performance over the past quarter-century. Part Two benchmarked product breakthroughs essential to modern mobility—ICs, LEDs and LCDs—that



This series started in response to a reader’s comment about the length of time it’s taking to commercialize our 3D Silicon™ Lithium-ion Rechargeable Battery (Enovix was founded in 2007). Part One described Sony’s 12-year pursuit to develop and commercialize a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery in 1991. It also presented an explanation as to why there has been no significant advancement in battery performance over the past quarter-century. The second post in



I’m going to deviate from the series I began with my last post to address the timely topic of battery safety. I’ll return to why it’s taking so long to build a better battery next week. Last week Consumer Reports published an online article about Samsung Note 7 smartphones catching fire while charging. Over the Labor Day weekend, major media, including The Wall Street Journal, reported that “Samsung Electronics is



Frost & Sullivan is a global research and consulting organization that focuses on identifying “The Next Big Things” in the industries it covers by understanding the interplay between industry convergence, mega trends, technologies and market trends. According to a Frost & Sullivan report, Implications of Mega Trends on Batteries, “Rapid advances in wearable devices and the Internet of Things (IoT) are being mirrored by breakthrough innovations in battery technologies.” The



The Enovix 3D cell architecture also provides several safety features not obtainable with a conventional Li-ion battery structure (see illustration below). Safety features of Enovix 3D cell architecture (source: Enovix Corporation) The Enovix cell architecture allows for a ceramic separator that tolerates higher temperatures than the polymeric separator in a conventional Li-ion battery. Excess capacity in the Enovix patented silicon anode reduces risk for lithium metal plating during overcharge conditions.



A previous post, Li-ion Battery Disadvantages, examines how the original magnetic recording tape production paradigm for the Li-ion battery has created performance limitations and safety issues. In contrast to the “jelly roll” structure of a conventional Li-ion battery, derived from magnetic recording tape production techniques, Enovix uses 3D cell architecture (see illustration below). Cross-section of Enovix 3D cell architecture (source: Enovix Corporation) The Enovix 3D cell is inherently rectangular. This